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Statistics

Here are some surprising statistics on distracted driving and its consequences:

Texting and Driving
  • Drivers engaged in visual-manual interactions with cell phones (e.g., texting) are up to eight times as likely to be involved in a crash. (AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 2017)
  • Checking a text for 5 seconds means that at 90 km/h, you’ve travelled the length of a football field blindfolded.
  • About 26% of all car crashes involve phone use, including hands-free phone use. (National Safety Council)
  • Estimates indicate drivers using phones look at, but fail to see, up to 50% of the information in their driving environment. (National Safety Council, 2012)
Distracted Driving
  • Drivers conversing on mobile devices, either hands-free or hand-held are up to four times as likely to be involved in a crash. (AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 2017)
  • 80% of collisions and 65% of near crashes have some form of driver inattention as contributing factors. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2010)
  • Driver distraction is a factor in about 4 million motor vehicle crashes in North America each year. (RCMP, 2014)
  • 10% of fatal crashes, 18% of injury crashes, and 16% of all police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes were distraction-affected crashes. (National Highway Safety Administration, 2015)
  • Distraction was a factor in nearly 6 out of 10 moderate-to-severe teen crashes. (AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 2015)
  • Almost half of all people killed in teen (15-19 years old) distraction-affected crashes were teens themselves. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2013)
  • The Economics of Distracted Driving
    • Economic losses caused by traffic collision-related health care costs and lost productivity are at least $10 billion annually. That’s about 1% of Canada’s GDP! (Government of Canada)
    • The economic and social consequence of road crashes in Canada is estimated to be $25 billion per year, including direct and indirect cost, as well as pain and suffering. (Traffic Injury Research Foundation)

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